Week 12

 

My first step in collecting evidence was to compare my pre-test with my post-tests. One of the first Pre-tests I gave was in the form of a quiz. In which ALL my students got less than a 50 percent on the first try. However, at the end of the unit all of my students got at least an A on the post-assessment quiz. It is important to note that this particular assessment did not have any transfer skill goals that related to real world scenarios. I used it for data purposes only. I have provided two student work examples with annotations written directly on them. For this purpose I refer to them as Student A and Student B.

 

Student A Pre-Test 0/25 Student A Post-Test 25/25

 

Student B Pre-Test 1/25 Student B Post-Test 23/25

 

Pre-Assessment NWEA SKILLS NAVIGATOR DATA

 

First I used a snapshot graph to determine if success was made. It was evident from the graphs on the coordinate geometry graphs that success was made. In this snapshot I was able to tell the overall number of points for passing was a 92 and needed work was a 60. In the post-test assessment the overall number of passed was a 160 and needed work was a 182. Both of these numbers jumped at the unit indicating the unit was successful. Needs work means the student at least knows some of the skills, just is not considered passing which is better than not meeting the criteria.

 

Pre-Test Skills Navigator Post-Test Skills Navigator

 

The next part of skills navigator that I looked at was the specific strands related to my unit. I compared the pretest to the post test with annotations. In the pre-assessment data I determined the following:

 

2 passed and 3 needed work meaning the other 4 didn’t even score on 5th grade strand locating a point in quadrant 1

 

4 needed work on and 5 didn’t even score on 6th grade strand locating points on the coordinate plane

 

Only 2 of the 9 students made it to needed work the others did not score on identifying the vertical and horizontal axis of the coordinate plane.

 

Only 1 of the 9 students was able to identify an ordered pair.

 

0 of the 9 students were able to solve real world problems with the coordinate plane.

 

NWEA PRE-ASSESSMENT DATA

In the post assessment data I determined the following:

7 passed and 1 needed work meaning the other 1 didn’t even score on 5th grade strand locating a point in quadrant 1

 

8 passes and 1 didn’t even score on 6th grade strand locating points on the coordinate plane

 

3 passed, 4 students made it to needed work the other 2 did not score on identifying the vertical and horizontal axis of the coordinate plane.

 

5 of the students was able to identify an ordered pair, 2 needed work the other 2 didn’t score.

2 passed, 4 needed work and the other 2 didn’t score on solving real world problems with the coordinate plane.

 

NWEA POST-ASSESSMENT DATA

 

The next pre and post assessment data I would like to compare are the authentic assessments I have created for the unit. It is important to note that I did not expect my students to be able to complete the pre-assessment data, but that I instead used it as a teachable moment in that I could show them the final process I was expecting and that I would be able to show in the end that they knew the standards that I was covering.

 

The final stages I am working on for my data collection is putting together the data that was done during the process. I am currently thinking of ways to show the data I used from assessments that guided the lessons. I have made a collection of pictures on my desktop that I will annotate along with student work. I also have compiled two students’ work that I need to spend time illustrating through words and pictures.  

 

This week was a really busy work and I ran short on time. I do plan to read others’ blogs this weekend and continue to show how I provided evidence. Tomorrow’s goal is to document how I assessed and used that data to guide the path of my lessons.

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